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Growing Together: Food Safety in Donation Gardens
Tips for keeping donation garden produce food safe during the stages of growing, harvest, and transport.
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Make Food Safety a Priority in Your School Garden
Research shows that a nutritious diet helps children learn better, and that kids are more likely to try and enjoy fresh vegetables and fruits if they helped grow them. School garden programs provide a unique opportunity for students to grow fresh vegetables, eat healthy food, and share their harvest with the rest of their school district by donating or selling it to the school cafeteria. To assure the food safety of the vegetables harvested from school gardens by students, schools should implement food safety protocols for their school garden activities.

This publication contains sample protocols for schools to use as they design best practices for their school gardens. These protocols are adapted from federal and state guidelines for Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) and Good Handling Practices (GHP).
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A Manager's Guide to Food Hub Finances - How to Evaluate and Improve Your Food Hub Operations
The purpose of this PDF guide (LF-0015A) is to explore how food hubs can use their own financial data to identify and address the strengths and challenges in their operation. Relying on data that most food hubs already have available in their financial records, we show how financial metrics can be used by managers to identify problems and risks and make decisions.

The accompanying Excel spreadsheet (LF-0015B) provides an additional tool to calculate and interpret key metrics from a food hub's operation.
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Local Food Coordinators Survey and Learning Circle Reports
In Iowa, more than 20 regional entities employ individuals as local food coordinators who promote the sale and purchase of locally grown food, provide regional capacity-building in local food systems and help build local food value chains. Iowa State University Extension and Outreach has begun a project to better understand the needs and challenges of local food coordinators, and to develop a program to better support both the coordinators and their supervisors. This report summarizes the project findings and outlines future plans for supporting local food coordinators across Iowa.
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Make Food Safety a Priority at Your Farmers Market Booth
Keeping food safe while operating a booth during a farmers market is critical to the success of a commercial operation. This publication discusses the ways to keep food clean and safe as it moves from farm to farmers market.
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Make Food Safety a Priority for Your CSA
As more consumers use Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farms for their fresh produce, keeping that food safe during harvest and storage is at the forefront of producer’s minds. This publication discusses how to keep food safe before, during and after delivery.
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Grain & Oilseed Risk Assessment Module
This module will introduce you to food safety hazards that may be present in the grain supply chain with a specific focus on grain and oilseeds. This grain module is brought to you by the Iowa Grain Quality Initiative, and was produced by the Crop Advisor Institute.

Click here to access the Grain & Oilseed Risk Assessment Module



Learning objective: Be able to define risk management framework according to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines. Recognize sources of harm, risk, likelihood, and severity. Identify the occurrence of food safety risks and evaluate risk control strategies.

Introduction: Generally, grain and oilseeds do not have a lot of factors which make them high risk in terms of food safety. However, poor handling practices, weather issues, and improper storage procedures can increase the likelihood of certain hazards, notably mycotoxins.

Harm: The first part of risk is harm. Harm in grain can be classified in four ways: microbiological, chemical, physical, and the potential of an allergen (for food uses). Most microbiological hazards can be eliminated with heat treatment or processing. By law, chemically treated seed cannot be in the grain supply chain. Seeds leftover after planting must be disposed of according to specified protocols. Proper sanitation will prevent physical sources of harm and allergen potential. Mycotoxin management is the most complex risk issue in grains.

Severity estimates: The second part of risk is the level of severity. To measure severity, factors are number of deaths, the type of injury or disability, whether hospitalization was required, and whether the injury is permanent or temporary. Remember that grain and oilseeds contribute to raw ingredients for hundreds of human and animal products.

Supporting information:
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Quality Assurance and Safety Module
The module will identify the individual responsible for quality assurance and feed safety in feed manufacturing, recognize the difference between hazard identification and hazard analysis, and identify the steps involved in a feed recall. This grain module is brought to you by the Iowa Grain Quality Initiative, and was produced by the Crop Advisor Institute.

Click here to access the Quality Assurance and Safety Module



Learning objective: Recognize the difference between hazard identification and hazard analysis. Identify the steps involved in a feed recall.

Introduction: The goal of feed quality assurance and feed safety programs is to provide a feed that is wholesome and nutritionally adequate. The feed mill manager and a team of specialists work to complete the desired level of feed and quality safety. Recent implementation of the Food Safety Modernization Act has required mills and other processors to have formal hazard analysis protocols.

Hazard identification: Hazard identification is the process of identifying a potential contaminant in food and classifying it as a physical, chemical, or biological hazard. It is a qualitative step that involves listing potential hazards within the mill and how those hazards entered the facility.

Hazard analysis: A hazard analysis evaluates hazards through collecting quantitative historical information. The analysis will show which hazards are significant and must be addressed in the feed safety plan. Hazards are assessed on severity, occurrence, history, and the likelihood of future occurrences.

Feed recalls: Even with proper hazard identification and analysis, programs can still fail. Recall steps are important to ensure feed quality and safety. Reasons for the recall must be clearly stated along with the discovery method.

Supporting information:
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Wheat Processing Module
This module will recognize components of wheat processing prior to receipt at feed mill, identify classes of wheat and wheat by-products commonly used as livestock feed ingredients, list food safety hazards associated with wheat and wheat by-products and identify specialized equipment used to process wheat and wheat by-products. This grain module is brought to you by the Iowa Grain Quality Initiative, and was produced by the Crop Advisor Institute.

Click here to access the Wheat Processing Module



Learning objective: Recognize components of wheat processing, identify classes and fractions of wheat, learn the specialized equipment needed, and understand potential food safety hazards.

Introduction: Wheat is sometimes fed as a grain to livestock in addition to being milled for flour. For pigs, it is ground, and for cattle it is steam-flaked. However, wheat is primarily grown for human consumption and is often not economically efficient to feed to livestock.

Processing: Wheat is processed into various grades of flour by cleaning, tempering, grinding, sifting, and purifying. Flour is sold to the baking industry.

Classes of wheat: The seven official classes of wheat are soft white, soft red spring, soft red winter, hard red winter, hard white, hard red spring, and durum. Classes are divided by hardness, color of kernels, and planting period. Each class has specific baking properties. The most common wheat by-products are wheat screenings and wheat middlings. The more fibrous and coarser fractions are used as animal feed ingredients. (Potential feed safety hazards associated with wheat or wheat by-products include non grain material, pesticides, chlorine, and vomitoxin.)

Equipment: Receiving separators, roller mills, sifters, and purifiers are important equipment in the wheat processing industry.
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Sanitation and Pest Management Module
The module will identify the components of a pest control program, including personnel and preventative practices used to reduce pests, identify individuals responsible for sanitation of specific process centers within the feed manufacturing facility. This grain module is brought to you by the Iowa Grain Quality Initiative, and was produced by the Crop Advisor Institute.

Click here to access the Sanitation and Pest Management Module



Learning objective: Identify components of a pest control program, individuals responsible for sanitation, common pests, associated hazards, and methods of pest control in a feed and grain facility.

Introduction: The only way to keep pests from entering the grain chain is a strong sanitation program. Feed mill managers are primarily responsible for developing a sanitation schedule, based on mill design, that includes storage of incoming ingredients, equipment management, and feed transportation. Pests include mice, rats, birds, and other rodents.

Integrated pest management (IPM): The key to successful IPM starts with inspection. Every facility should have an inspection checklist customized to detect and correct issues as they emerge. Inspections and monitoring help define the presence, numbers, and spread of infestations. Periodic examination of monitoring data will indicate the benefits of IPM. Pest control is also a major element of the Food Safety Modernization Act Good Manufacturing Practices.

Food safety hazards: Physical hazards include the bodies or excreta of pests themselves. Chemical hazards involve pesticides or cleaners. Good manufacturing practices separate chemicals from feed so contamination does not occur. Biological hazards may occur if pests are carrying microbial pathogens, or if wet cleaning processes are used and equipment is not completely dry.

Supporting information:
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Rendered Ingredients Module
This module identify rendered ingredients, list the component steps of the rendered process prior to receipt at the feed mill, identify specialized equipment used to process rendered ingredients, and list hazards associated with rendered ingredients. This grain module is brought to you by the Iowa Grain Quality Initiative, and was produced by the Crop Advisor Institute.

Click here to access the Rendered Ingredients Module



Learning objective: Identify ingredients, the steps of the rendering process, specialized equipment, and associated hazards.

Introduction: The rendering industry is vital to the sustainability of the animal feed industry. It provides the utilization of products that would be otherwise unused as feedstuffs. Common rendered ingredients include: feather meal, poultry meal, meat and bone meal, blood meal, spray dried animal plasma, fish meal, poultry fat, beef tallow, choice white grease, and yellow grease.

Rendering process: The rendering process includes receiving feedstuffs and by-products, sorting them into similar sizes, and press cooking them to separate fats prior to grinding. Of these steps, the cooking process is most pivotal.

Equipment: Specific equipment used in rendering includes sizing equipment, cookers, a feed press, and hammer mills.

Potential: Potential feed safety hazards include physical products, cleaning chemicals, and potential microbial risks inside slaughter or rendering facilities. The Rendering Code of Practice minimizes these risks in a preventative manner so that rendered ingredients pose a low animal feed or human food safety risk.
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Grain & Oilseed Basics Module
This module is to acquaint you with various grains and oilseeds grown in the United States and discusses how the major grains (wheat and corn) and soybeans are handled, processed, and used in food, feed, and industrial markets. This grain module is brought to you by the Iowa Grain Quality Initiative and was produced by the Crop Advisor Institute.

Click here to access the Grain & Oilseed Basics Module



Learning objective: Identify major grains and oilseeds. Understand the importance of production locations and harvest schedules in terms of both food safety and quality needs.

Introduction: This modules describes quality factors and typical production, harvest, and handling procedures for wheat, corn, and soybeans. It also describes small grains such as barley, rice and millet, as well as other types of oilseeds such as canola, sunflower, flax, and cottonseed.

Grains and oilseeds: Individual field loads are blended with those from other farms as they enter the marketing chain to be sold as a bulk commodity. Bulk commodities often pass through several handling facilities before reaching a user. At each point, grain lots are combined or divided as needed for efficient shipment to the next buyer.

USDA grade standards: Grains are traded as bulk commodities using USDA Grade factors. Grade factors are determined by either official inspectors of the Federal Grain Inspection Service (FGIS), or by the buyer as determined by purchase contract. Factors considered under the Grades are: test weight, broken or split kernels, foreign material, damage, and odor. Buyers and sellers may also specify other factors in their purchase contract. For example, wheat is normally traded on protein content, while most other grains have no composition specification.
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Oilseed Processing Module
Oilseeds and their by-products are valuable ingredients for livestock and poultry. This module will identify components of oilseed processing prior to receipt at feed mill, identify common oilseeds and by-products, list hazards associated with oilseeds and by-products, and identify specialized equipment used to process oilseeds and by-products. This grain module is brought to you by the Iowa Grain Quality Initiative, and was produced by the Crop Advisor Institute.

Click here to access the Oilseed Processing Module



Learning objective: Identify common oilseeds and oilseed by-products, learn the components of the oilseed process, explore the specialized equipment needed, and identify potential hazards.

Introduction: Oilseeds and their by-products are valuable ingredients for livestock and poultry. Common oilseeds are sun¬flowers, safflowers, canola, flax, and soybeans. The oil produced is usually used for human consumption, but soybean oilseed meal is most often used in animal feed.

Oilseed processing: Oilseed processing is done by solvent extraction. Multiple steps are taken to remove the hull, flake the meat, extract and refine the oil, and then process the remaining meal appropriately.

Equipment: Specific equipment used during oilseed processing includes: dehullers, flakers, extractors, centrifuges for refinement, the Desolventizer Toaster Dryer Cooler (DTDC) machine, and hammer mills.

Potential hazards: The potential feed safety hazards associated with oilseeds and their by-products include non-grain material, solvent residues, grain chemicals, and mold. However, potential feed safety hazards present a very low risk to animal and human health if consumed.

This module was created at Kansas State University as part of a cooperative agreement with the Food and Drug Administration for food safety inspector training.
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Determining Factors for Local Food Systems Success
Determining Factors for Local Food System Success analyzes the characteristics of factors that enable and hinder local food systems development within communities. Based on in-depth case studies of six of the most successful local food systems in the US, researchers present proven tactics for success in each of seven factors, or "community capitals." By using this guidebook, local food systems developers can identify resources and mitigate challenges in their own communities.
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Determination of Potential Microbial Hazard(s) in Animal Food
There are many factors that can contribute to feed becoming contaminated with a microbial hazard during the production of food for pets and livestock. The purpose of this reference document is to provide inspection program personnel with instructions to determine potential microbial contaminations that can lead to a food safety crisis within production facilities manufacturing food for pets and livestock.
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Risk Assessment Framework
Risk analysis activity for this project can be divided into two major components. The first section will examine the grain supply chain and determined the routes of potential compromises in food safety for corn and soybean supply chains. The second section will look specifically at the adulteration routes and determine the probability of occurrence for each. This measurement will allow for the development of control points so that the health of human and animal consumers can be protected.
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A Guide to Sustainable Food Procurement for Retail Foodservices
Where and how food is grown or produced is of interest to consumers and retail foodservices; sustainable food production is a key part of this interest. The Guide to Sustainable Food Procurement addresses food purchases that have positive social, environmental, and economic outcomes. Organized into five sections, the Guide provides an overview about food purchasing and segments focused on four food commodities: fresh shell eggs, dairy, fresh produce, and meats. Each segment presents science-based background information about conventional and alternative production practices addressing food safety, environmental impact, social concerns, nutrition, animal welfare, and/or quality characteristics.
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Food Safety Tips for Food Event Volunteers
Foodborne illness outbreaks can happen anywhere and can affect a large number of people. Follow these tips to avoid a foodborne illness outbreak.
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Local Food Organizational Toolkit - Part 3: Funding your local food organization
Part Three of this toolkit series lays out methods of funding a local foods organization. A variety of revenue sources are outlined, each depending on the legal structure of your organization. Discussed in this publication: in-kind gifts, membership campaigns and fees, merchandise sales, events, sponsorships, crowdfunding, grants, investors and loans. Information on organizations that are tax deductible is included. Budgets and fundraising are emphasized. Resources and practical helps in this publication will help take your idea from concept to reality.
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Dare to Excel newsletter - February
Take a look at online safety – the Internet can be a dangerous place for children. Includes tips to reduce a child’s risk of being victimized; signs a child might be at risk of an online predator; ways to set up controls on your computer; and ways to keep your child safe from cyber bullying.
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News Release
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Iowa Food Hub: Managing Cash Flow for a Low-Capital Food Hub Start-up
For food hubs, or businesses that aggregate and distribute local food, limited funds can be a barrier to growth. If food hub managers pay close attention to cash flow, however, they can grow their business using the income generated by the business itself, and reduce the need for grants or loans in the start-up phase.

This publication explains the idea of cash flow and how food hub managers can use it to their advantage, drawing on the real-world experiences of Iowa Food Hub.

See more at: www.leopold.iastate.edu/marketing/food-hubs.
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Non-food Alternatives for School Rewards and Fundraising
Some food items used for student rewards and school fundraising activities send a conflicting message compared to what is taught about healthy food choices. Check this list of ideas for non-food rewards for elementary, middle, and high school students. More than 50 non-food fundraising ideas also are given.
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Food Stand Operations - What You Need to Know - Safe Food
Selling a variety of food and beverages can be an effective fundraising activity, but only if no one gets sick. Find out what organizers and workers need to know before the event regarding regulations and food safety.
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Safe Food Is YOUR Job - Health and Hygiene Tips for Food Handlers
Outlines three actions for food handlers to take related to hand washing, staying home when sick, and wearing proper work attire.
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A Guide to Food Safety - Retail Foodservice Employees
This 2-page brochure is for retail foodservice employees focusing on handwashing, temperature/time, and cleaning/sanitizing guidelines.
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A Guide to Food Safety - School Foodservice Employees
This 2-page brochure is for school foodservice employees focusing on handwashing, temperature/time, and cleaning/sanitizing guidelines.
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A Guide to Food Safety - Assisted Living Employees
This 2-page brochure is for assisted living foodservice employees focusing on handwashing, temperature/time, and cleaning/sanitizing guidelines.
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Food and Nutrition 4-H Project Area Hot Sheet
In this project you can do fun experiments, prepare recipes, and go on fact-finding missions. You'll have fun learning about food ingredients, food characteristics, nutrition and food safety.
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On-farm Food Safety: Cleaning and Sanitizing Guide
Suggested checklists, standard procedures, and schedules to document proper on-farm cleaning and sanitizing practices.
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Thermometer Use in Retail Foodservice Establishments -- What Managers Need to Know
Provides detailed descriptions of common temperature-sensing tools plus tips on using them to help foodservice managers ensure food safety and quality.
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On-farm Food Safety: Food Handling Guide
Details of safe food handling habits related to health, hygiene, and handwashing for all farm workers.
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Maintaining Food Safety Through Quality
Food safety is a worldwide issue affecting millions of people who suffer from diseases caused by contaminated food. Policy makers are looking to enhanced quality management systems for tracing food back to its source. This report will give producers, researchers and consumers a summary of efforts by Iowa State University Extension in food safety, quality management systems and traceability of grain and livestock products.
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Découvrir les Dangers Cachés de la Ferme - Le Club des Mystères | French version of "The Mystery Club"
Farm safety newsletter and activities for you, focusing on farm accidents, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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Ces Machines Puissantes - Le Club des Mystères | French version of "The Mystery Club"
Farm safety newsletter and activities for you, focusing on farm accidents, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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La Bonne Piste de la Sécurité des Tracteurs - Le Club des Mystères | French version of "The Mystery Club"
Farm safety newsletter and activities for you, focusing on farm accidents, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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La Sécurité Avec les Oiseaux, les Abeilles et d’Autres Bêtes - Les Club des Mystères | French version of "The Mystery Club"
Farm safety newsletter and activities for you, focusing on farm accidents, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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Les Produits Chimiques : le Bon, le Mauvais et le Mortel - Le Club des Mystères | French version of "The Mystery Club"
Farm safety newsletter and activities for you, focusing on farm accidents, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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Les Accidents à la Ferme : Qui Vas-Tu Appeler? - Le Club des Mystères | French version of "The Mystery Club"
Farm safety newsletter and activities for you, focusing on farm accidents, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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A Year of Food Safety Messages
Monthly food safety reminders are provided in this add-your-own dates calendar poster series intended for use by food service managers.
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Food Safety Considerations When Choosing Assisted Living Facilities
Checklist of questions concerning food safety issues to help you evaluate foodservice operations in assisted living facilities, elder group homes, and adult daycare facilities.
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Looking at Assisted Living Facilities? Think about Food Safety
Asking these 32 questions will help you learn more about the assisted living facilities you visit. Includes resource list.
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Safety Project Guide -- 4-H Youth Development
Use this guide to help identify some possible goals for your safety project and plan safety related goals in other projects.
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Food Safety For Baby & Me/La Seguridad Alimenticia Durante el Embarazo
Learn about food safety during pregnancy. This leaflet describes symptoms of foodborne illnesses and lists recommended cooking temperatures for meats. Risky foods also are listed along with suggestions for safer substitutions.

The current Food and Drug Administration and Environmental Protection Agency recommendations for fish consumption are included along with the Iowa Web site to check for local fish advisories.

Printed in English and Spanish.
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Sigue Las Huellas Del Tractor por el Camino Seguro -- El Club Misterio | Spanish version of "The Mystery Club"
Farm safety newsletter and activities for you, focusing on farm accidents, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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Precauciones con Aves, Abejas, y Otras Bestias -- El Club Misterio | Spanish version of "The Mystery Club"
Farm safety newsletter and activities for you, focusing on farm accidents, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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Descubriendo Los Peligros Escondidos de la Granja -- El Club Misterio | Spanish version of "The Mystery Club"
Farm safety newsletter and activities for you, focusing on farm accidents, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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Los Químicos: lo Bueno, lo Malo y lo Mortal -- El Club Misterio | Spanish version of "The Mystery Club"
Farm safety newsletter and activities for you, focusing on farm accidents, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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Las Máquinas Poderosas -- El Club Misterio | Spanish version of "The Mystery Club"
Farm safety newsletter and activities for you, focusing on farm accidents, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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Problemas en la Granja ¿a Quién Llamaras? -- El Club Misterio | Spanish version of "The Mystery Club"
Farm safety newsletter and activities for you, focusing on farm accidents, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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Food Safety and Quality Assurance -- Leader's Manual
This leader’s guide will help you better understand the concepts of food safety and quality assurance and provide the resources to teach annual workshops for all youth enrolled in food production. Includes sections on record keeping, healthy production practices, care and handling, and feed and feed additives.
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On-farm Food Safety: Guide to Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs)
Learn how to develop a food safety plan on the farm that documents your risk reduction efforts.
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Iowa Food Security, Insecurity and Hunger -- Emergency Food Resources: Meeting Food Needs of Iowa Households
Report of an ISU Extension study of people who used food pantries in Polk, Scott, Decatur, and Monroe counties in 2002.
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Iowa Food Security, Insecurity and Hunger -- No More Food Stamps: Iowa Households that Left the Food Stamp Program
Details of a research project that studied Iowa food stamp recipients who left the program in 1997.
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Food Safety and Quality Assurance -- Member's Manual
Learn how to produce the safest food possible (livestock, poultry, dairy). Intended for grades 4-12.
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Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll 2003 Summary Report
Highlights include opinions on community well-being, quality of life, and sense of community. Questions were also asked about biotechnology, food safety, GMOs, and more.
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Unveiling Hidden Farm Hazards -- The Mystery Club
Farm safety newsletter and activities for you, focusing on farm accidents, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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Those Mighty Machines -- The Mystery Club
Farm safety newsletter and activities for youth, focusing on farm equipment, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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Farm Mishaps: Who You Gonna Call? -- The Mystery Club
Farm safety newsletter and activities for youth, focusing on accident response, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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Chemicals: The Good, The Bad, and The Deadly -- The Mystery Club
Farm safety newsletter and activities for youth, focusing on chemicals, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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On Track with Tractor Safety -- The Mystery Club
Farm safety newsletter and activities for youth, focusing on tractor safety, brought to you by Captain Overalls, the safety crusader.
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Safety with Birds, Bees, and Other Beasts -- The Mystery Club
Farm safety newsletter and activities for youth, focusing on livestock, brought to you by Captain Overalls, safety crusader.
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Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll 2000 Summary Report
Survey results from nearly 5,000 farmers in 2000 highlighted the following topics: biotechnology, food safety and health, transgenic hybrids, average distance traveled to obtain services (business, community, etc.), recreational and leisure activities, minority and immigrant issues, alternative livestock production, financial conditions, and quality of life.
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Produce Handling for Direct Marketing
For growers selling seasonal produce at local or roadside markets. This illustrated, two-color manual describes: Postharvest physiology. Food safety. Produce handling from harvest to storage. Refrigerated storage. Produce displays. Specific handling and display recommendations for more than 40 types of fruits and vegetables.
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